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Hollywood and the Homefront: Tinsel Town's Contribution to World War II

2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Wenatchee Library
Periodical Room
During World War II, the War Department realized the importance of not only keeping up the morale of America’s fighting forces abroad, but the morale of those at home. The result was an unprecedented push by Hollywood to contribute morale-building war dramas, troop entertainment, and training films to the war effort. Special radio programs, documentary films, and live performances told Americans at home that they too could serve in the defense of their country by purchasing war bonds, participating in scrap drives, planting Victory Gardens, and volunteering.

Experience the still-powerful images, radio, and film that emerged from this dramatic time in American history. Audio historian and former broadcaster John Jensen shares rarely known stories and anecdotes from Hollywood’s war effort, and shows examples of wartime propaganda through various media that was used to educate, inform, and sway American public opinion.

A former San Francisco broadcaster, John Jensen is an avid collector of music, movies, and radio broadcasts of the 1930s and 40s. Early fascination led to employment as general manager of KMPX, a radio station devoted to playing the music and radio broadcasts of those years. He has produced two radio broadcasts that were heard world-wide. As an audio historian, he has provided research and assorted media to filmmakers such as Jack Haley, Jr., Frances Ford Coppola, and George Lucas. Read more about John Jensen and his talk here.

Sponsored by Humanities Washington's Speakers Bureau. To learn more, visit www.humanities.org.
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Meet the Author: Kaylee Shadows

6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Royal City Library
Main Room
Join us for a evening with Kaylee Shadows! Kaylee is a Relationship Specialist, Love Coach, and author of many self-help books, including Loving the Real You.

Don't miss this fun opportunity to hear her speak about her books, her writing process, and self-publishing.

This program is intended for an adult audience.
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Meet the Author: Dr. Victoria Hubbell

6:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Wenatchee Library
Periodical Room
Dr. Hubbell will discuss Blood River Rising, which was a Chautauqua prize finalist for 2017. It details the true story of how the Ku Klux Klan fueled a family feud between two Missouri families in the post WWI era. More than just a story of a feud, Blood River Rising whispers a warning for today's increasingly diverse society.
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Meet the Author: Deb Cuyle

6:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Leavenworth Library
Main Area
Author Deborah Cuyle shares Ghosts of Leavenworth and the Cascade Foothills in this spooky Friday evening at the library. Deborah Cuyle is also the author of Haunted Snohomish, Cannon Beach, Oregon, and Kidding Around Portland.

For more information, visit A Book For All Seasons' website.
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Meet the Author: Lauren Danner

6:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Leavenworth Library
Main Area
Meet Lauren Danner, author of Crown Jewel Wilderness: Creating North Cascades National Park. Dr. Danner's new book chronicles the creation of North Cascades National Park just in time for its upcoming fiftieth anniversary in 2018. Lauren Danner, PhD, is a writer and historian based in Olympia, Washington. She focuses on public lands policy, Pacific Northwest and environmental history, and outdoor recreation. She is a former college professor, museum director, and Washington State field coordinator for the Lewis and Clark bicentennial.

For more information, visit A Book for All Seasons and laurendanner.com.
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Meet the Author: Robin Gainey

6:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Leavenworth Library
Main Area
Local author Robin Gainey will share Light of the Northern Dancers, a powerful western romance that chronicles how the lives of a fiery aristocrat, a backwoods spitfire, and an enigmatic holy man intersect against the terrible beauty of drought-worn 1890's Wyoming.

Gainey will also discuss her novel-to-film adaptation process.

For more information, visit A Book for All Seasons.
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The Ancient Fruitcake: What Really, Really Old Food Tells Us about History, Culture, Love, and Memory

6:00 PM - 7:15 PM
Manson Library
Main Room
This talk is not about the old leftovers in the fridge. It is about food that is so old, so unusual, or so meaningful, that no one dares throw it away. Discover the foods archeologists have found buried with mummies, the petrified banana so appealing it sparked a Banana Museum, the 350-year-old fruitcake handed down through generations, 2000-year-old bog butter; and the pickle that has been in a jar since the 1860s. During this “chew and chat,” author and broadcaster Harriet Baskas explores how and why these and other formerly fresh foods may have been forgotten, intentionally tucked away, or preserved due to unusual or peculiar circumstances.

And, more importantly, we’ll talk about how these and other vintage vittles can and do hold memories, tell stories, and connect us with family, culture, and history.

Harriet Baskas has a Masters in Communications from the University of Washington, and has served as the general manager for three community radio stations in Oregon and Washington. She is the author of seven books, including Hidden Treasures: What Museums Can't or Won't Show You. She currently writes about airports, air travel, museums, and other topics for NBC News, CNBC, USA Today, and other outlets. Read more about Harriet Baskas and her talk here.

Sponsored by Humanities Washington's Speakers Bureau. To learn more, visit www.humanities.org.
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The Ancient Fruitcake: What Really, Really Old Food Tells Us about History, Culture, Love, and Memory

6:30 PM - 7:45 PM
Wenatchee Library
Periodical Room
This talk is not about the old leftovers in the fridge. It is about food that is so old, so unusual, or so meaningful, that no one dares throw it away. Discover the foods archeologists have found buried with mummies, the petrified banana so appealing it sparked a Banana Museum, the 350-year-old fruitcake handed down through generations, 2000-year-old bog butter; and the pickle that has been in a jar since the 1860s. During this “chew and chat,” author and broadcaster Harriet Baskas explores how and why these and other formerly fresh foods may have been forgotten, intentionally tucked away, or preserved due to unusual or peculiar circumstances.

And, more importantly, we’ll talk about how these and other vintage vittles can and do hold memories, tell stories, and connect us with family, culture, and history.

Harriet Baskas has a Masters in Communications from the University of Washington, and has served as the general manager for three community radio stations in Oregon and Washington. She is the author of seven books, including Hidden Treasures: What Museums Can't or Won't Show You. She currently writes about airports, air travel, museums, and other topics for NBC News, CNBC, USA Today, and other outlets. Read more about Harriet Baskas and her talk here.

Sponsored by Humanities Washington's Speakers Bureau. To learn more, visit www.humanities.org.
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The Ancient Fruitcake: What Really, Really Old Food Tells Us about History, Culture, Love, and Memory

6:00 PM - 7:15 PM
Twisp Library
Main Area
This talk is not about the old leftovers in the fridge. It is about food that is so old, so unusual, or so meaningful, that no one dares throw it away. Discover the foods archeologists have found buried with mummies, the petrified banana so appealing it sparked a Banana Museum, the 350-year-old fruitcake handed down through generations, 2000-year-old bog butter; and the pickle that has been in a jar since the 1860s. During this “chew and chat,” author and broadcaster Harriet Baskas explores how and why these and other formerly fresh foods may have been forgotten, intentionally tucked away, or preserved due to unusual or peculiar circumstances.

And, more importantly, we’ll talk about how these and other vintage vittles can and do hold memories, tell stories, and connect us with family, culture, and history.

Harriet Baskas has a Masters in Communications from the University of Washington, and has served as the general manager for three community radio stations in Oregon and Washington. She is the author of seven books, including Hidden Treasures: What Museums Can't or Won't Show You. She currently writes about airports, air travel, museums, and other topics for NBC News, CNBC, USA Today, and other outlets. Read more about Harriet Baskas and her talk here.

Sponsored by Humanities Washington's Speakers Bureau. To learn more, visit www.humanities.org.
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The Ancient Fruitcake: What Really, Really Old Food Tells Us about History, Culture, Love, and Memory

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Waterville Library
Main Area
This talk is not about the old leftovers in the fridge. It is about food that is so old, so unusual, or so meaningful, that no one dares throw it away. Discover the foods archeologists have found buried with mummies, the petrified banana so appealing it sparked a Banana Museum, the 350-year-old fruitcake handed down through generations, 2000-year-old bog butter; and the pickle that has been in a jar since the 1860s. During this “chew and chat,” author and broadcaster Harriet Baskas explores how and why these and other formerly fresh foods may have been forgotten, intentionally tucked away, or preserved due to unusual or peculiar circumstances.

And, more importantly, we’ll talk about how these and other vintage vittles can and do hold memories, tell stories, and connect us with family, culture, and history.

Harriet Baskas has a Masters in Communications from the University of Washington, and has served as the general manager for three community radio stations in Oregon and Washington. She is the author of seven books, including Hidden Treasures: What Museums Can't or Won't Show You. She currently writes about airports, air travel, museums, and other topics for NBC News, CNBC, USA Today, and other outlets. Read more about Harriet Baskas and her talk here.

Sponsored by Humanities Washington's Speakers Bureau. To learn more, visit www.humanities.org.
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The Ancient Fruitcake: What Really, Really Old Food Tells Us about History, Culture, Love, and Memory

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Tonasket Library
Main Area
This talk is not about the old leftovers in the fridge. It is about food that is so old, so unusual, or so meaningful, that no one dares throw it away. Discover the foods archeologists have found buried with mummies, the petrified banana so appealing it sparked a Banana Museum, the 350-year-old fruitcake handed down through generations, 2000-year-old bog butter; and the pickle that has been in a jar since the 1860s. During this “chew and chat,” author and broadcaster Harriet Baskas explores how and why these and other formerly fresh foods may have been forgotten, intentionally tucked away, or preserved due to unusual or peculiar circumstances.

And, more importantly, we’ll talk about how these and other vintage vittles can and do hold memories, tell stories, and connect us with family, culture, and history.

Harriet Baskas has a Masters in Communications from the University of Washington, and has served as the general manager for three community radio stations in Oregon and Washington. She is the author of seven books, including Hidden Treasures: What Museums Can't or Won't Show You. She currently writes about airports, air travel, museums, and other topics for NBC News, CNBC, USA Today, and other outlets. Read more about Harriet Baskas and her talk here.

Sponsored by Humanities Washington's Speakers Bureau. To learn more, visit www.humanities.org.
View More